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Vict / Ed VII Suffolk Regiment Officers Home Service Uniform.

Vict / Ed VII Suffolk Regiment Officers Home Service Uniform.

The full dress uniform worn by an officer of the Suffolk regiment around 1905-10. The uniform itself is late Victorian but has had all the changes in insignia for Edward VII. It comprises of the Tunic, scarlet with yellow facings, white piping and bullion epaulettes with the rank insignia for a Lieutenant Colonel, the inside is lined half/half with silk and wool. It has brass buttons, these would have been gilt brass originally. Sword Belt, made of bullion wire with an ornate gilt buckle and brass sword hooks. Sash, red silk and gold bullion with officers knot and tassels. Aiguillette’s made of gold bullion wire with gilt brass toggles. Trousers are made of a light wool and are typical of the trousers worn by all infantry officers at the time, dark blue/black with a red stripe down the outside of each leg. Shoes, here we have an original pair of late Victorian officers black leather court shoes.
The Helmet, a superb quality officers blue cloth home served helmet made by Hawks & Co London. It has all original fittings and gilt brass & silver Helmet plate with Kings Crown.
This uniform was displayed in a museum for many years, although very well looked after it got a bit dusty, so there are areas of dust staining here and there on the tunic. It needs dry cleaning and it will come up as new. It has no moth damage and has been treated against any future infestation, but to keep it completely moth free, it needs treating yearly. Inside some of the silk has started to perish, but it is not beyond saving. Apart from these small issues, this tunic is in lovely overall condition. It measures;
All the tunic accoutrements are in excellent original condition with just slight signs of use.
The Trousers are also in excellent order, again with signs of use, these measure;
The shoes are rare and have good wear, the inside sole liner has come adrift and needs regluing but they are sound and just need a good polish.
The helmet is in perfect order, its only fault is three small spots on the peek, where it has been splashed with mud or something similar, this just needs steaming off or wiped gently with a warm damp cloth. The silver parts to the helmet plate and the brass parts, now have a dark tone where it hasn’t been polished for years. But this is all being really picky, it is a beautiful helmet. The helmet is around a size 7 but the liner can be adjusted.
A superb original uniform, which looks magnificent on a manikin, in remarkable condition for its age, unfortunately there is no name anywhere on this uniform, but a Lieutenant Colonel would have had no need to put his name on his uniform, as he would have had a batman to take care of all his items. This uniform also comes in its original canvas and leather traveling trunk.
Shipping via courier due to size and weight of trunk priced at £12.95

Code: 27298

Reserved


Vict / Ed VII Suffolk Regiment Officers Home Service Uniform.

Vict / Ed VII Suffolk Regiment Officers Home Service Uniform.


More photographs of the full dress uniform worn by an officer of the Suffolk regiment.
THE HELMET

Code: 27297

780.00 GBP


Victorian Crimean War Pair to Clark 62nd  Regiment.

Victorian Crimean War Pair to Clark 62nd Regiment.

A superb Victorian Crimea war pair of the Crimean war medal with Sebastopol clasp (correctly attached) officially impressed naming to; 2365 Geo Clark. 62nd Foot. And the Turkish Crimea medal, unnamed as issued. Both medals are mounted on these wonderful matching silver buckle bars, the have a brooch pin on the back for wearing and both are original to the medals.
George Clark was probably one of the new recruits to the 62nd (Wiltshire) regiment arriving in the Crimea after the battles of Inkerman Heights in the latter part of 1854. The 62nd spent the worst Russian winter for 100 years in trenches and tents on the heights in front of Sevastopol.
In June they took part in their first major action, the assault on the Quarries which were in front of the Great Redan On reaching the Quarries they withstood six Russian counter attacks. The Quarries trench system faced in the wrong direction and as a consequence provided little cover. They ran out of ammunition and continued the fight with swords, bayonets and stones. As a result of the capture of the Quarries ten mortars were installed to support another attack that took place later in the same month. Long months of trench duty followed, the men were up to their ankles in freezing muddy water with no hot food to warm them. They used anything they could find to keep themselves warm; clothes taken from the dead, water bottle covers were used on their feet, and any scrap of blanket to be had was wrapped around their legs and many took winter clothing from the dead Russians, so by the end of that terrible winter, the British army looked like a band of vagrants with long beards and hair. There was no wood for fires, so men were constantly foraging for roots to burn to give just a little rest bite from the bitter cold. The rate of disease and sickness was horrific; most men were suffering from some degree of Dysentery in turn this caused weight loss, which made the cold much worse. Cholera was rife due to lack of any proper sanitation and any form of medicine was thin on the ground and confined to the worse cases in the hospitals. However, through the extreme hardships of the 1854 winter, there was no complaint, each soldier did his duty and was resigned to not making home.
The following September after an eleven month siege, the 62nd took a leading part in the attack on the Great Redan, losing half the sergeants and officers and over 100 men. Part of the 2nd division they rushed the Redan with the light division; the two lead brigades were under the command of Acting Brigadier General Charles Ash Windham (known as the Hero of the Redan) and Brigadier General Horatio Shirley. In the face of devastating Russian fire, Shirley's brigade was driven back by a crossfire from the left, but Windham's brigade stormed the Great Redan and the broke the Vladimirski Regiment. The 62nd reached their objective and engaged the Russians in hand to hand fighting. For two hours they helped hold the Great Redan, until the British infantry could put a heavy fire on the Russian reserve line.
Twenty five of all ranks were mentioned in Despatches for bravery, more than any other Regiment taking part.
British losses in the Crimea were high compared to the size of force involved, with more dying from disease, cold, shortage of food, clothing and medical supplies than from wounds. The 62nd's losses were almost equal to their original strength when they landed and British losses at the Great Redan was over 4,000.

Code: 27296

Reserved


Late Victorian Royal Naval Sextant.

Late Victorian Royal Naval Sextant.

An English, brass admiralty naval sextant in excellent original condition with all lenses and filter present and a shaped Mahogany handle suitable for all weather conditions. The radius sextant moves around its arc to aid navigation, Vernier adjustment, folding UV filters to protect against daytime sunlight and it comes in its original fitted Mahogany case with brass fittings.
It has a final calibration certificate inside the lid of its box, done by Hughes & Son London on the 16th April 1900.
This whole piece is in excellent condition, it shows some signs of use to various parts, but these are not worn. A fabulous maritime instrument in wonderful condition.

Code: 27295

350.00 GBP


18th Century 1780’s Regulation Spadroon.

18th Century 1780’s Regulation Spadroon.

An early regulation Infantry officers Spadroon with a steel ‘D’ shaped guard, leather covered grip with double twisted wire and steel pommel. This hilt was originally gilded as small traces of the gilt still remains in areas. It has a good straight blade with spear point, the blade still retains its original etching and some of the bluing which would have defined the decoration. It comes in a Victorian leather and brass scabbard, probably a genuine replacement. The condition is all good, no damage just age. A rare sword in untouched condition, measuring 38.5 inches long in scabbard.
Shipping to UK mainland only via courier priced at £15.95

Code: 27294

Reserved


Victorian 1845 Pattern Infantry Officers Sword by Hill.

Victorian 1845 Pattern Infantry Officers Sword by Hill.

A very nice 1845 pattern infantry officers sword with a gilt brass guard with Queen Victoria’s cypher and a folding section and a ray skin grip bound with silver wire. The long curved steel blade still retains its original etching of foliate scrolls and queen Victoria’s crown. At the ricasso on one side is the brass proof disk and on the other side is the makers details of H Hill, Old Bond Street London.
This sword id in lovely condition with no damage and the hilt still retains a lot of its original gilt finish. The blade is clean and free from rust and pitting.
It comes with its original brass scabbard, this has suffered a bit over the years, but it has kept the blade safe and dry. the scabbard has some dings and dents, but complete with both hanger rings and no cracking or split seams.
All in all a very nice sword in overall very good order, measuring 39 inches long.
Ship to UK mainland only via courier priced at £15.95

Code: 27293

Reserved


WW1 Memorial Plaque & Trio to Collins Bedfordshire Reg KIA Somme 1916.

WW1 Memorial Plaque & Trio to Collins Bedfordshire Reg KIA Somme 1916.

A bronze memorial plaque and the 1914/15 star, British war and victory medal all correctly named to 19672 Private Walter Collins of the 8th battalion the Bedfordshire regiment.
The 8th Battalion was a "Service" battalion that was formed specifically for the duration of the war. It was raised at Bedford in October 1914, as part of K3 Lord Kitchener's 3rd 'call to arms' for another 100,000 men to leave their civilian lives and enlist into the expanding British Army. That month, the enlisted men of the 8th Battalion, in the Third New Army were attached to the 71st Brigade of the 24th Division and remained there for a year.
The enlisted men from all over the county mustered at their local train stations and were transported en-masse to the Regimental HQ at Bedford to be mobilised into the 8th Battalion of the Regiment. Other than a brief spell in Brighton, most of their training was undertaken in Surrey, with almost seven months being spent in the sprawling New Army training area around Woking.
Finally, the increasingly restless men of the 'Hungry 8th', (a nickname used in a letter home from Private 19861 Leslie Worboys) received orders to mobilise and prepared to ship out. At 11pm on the 28th August 1915, the Battalion boarded the troop trains at Chobham Station and left for Dover. After transferring straight onto troop ships, they arrived at Boulogne early on the 30th August 1915.
Six weeks after landing in France, on the 11th October 1915, the entire 71st Brigade was transferred with the to the 6th Division, who were a veteran Regular Army Division that had been serving in France since 1914. During another reorganisation on 17th November 1915, the battalion were transferred to the 16th Brigade of the 6th Division. The 8th battalion served entirely in France and Flanders during the war and fought in every major battle during the battalion's active service, gaining a reliable reputation within a professional, Regular Division and winning many gallantry medals. In 1915 they were one of the few 'New Army' units to be committed to The Battle of Loos in September. They were also in the line when the army experienced the first German use of Phosgene gas in December, losing hundreds of men in the attack. In mid 1916 the battalion was involved in the Battle of Flers-Courcelette and the Battle of Morval, it’s the latter that interests us here. On the morning of the 15th September the battalion went into action, their objective was to take the Quadrangle at Morval Les Boeufs. To follow a detachment of Tanks and a heavy machine gun section but before the attack a heavy barrage of artillery was expected on the enemy’s position. At zero hour, the tanks did not arrive and the artillery barrage was not as heavy as expected. The men of the 8th battalion went into action under very heavy shellfire from the German trenches and were forced to take cover in shell holes, but shells were literally raining down, it must have been horrific, one survivor later wrote that during the attack it looked like the whole ground was exploding, his comrades were there, then just gone. Private Walter Collins was Killed during this attack on the 15th September 1916. His body was never recovered and he is now remembered with honour on the Thiepval Memorial. He was the 35 year old husband of Mary Collins of 3 Orpingley Road London. It is also mentioned on his CWGC certificate that Walter also served in the Boer war, this is to be researched.
All medals and plaque are in very good original condition and they comes with a small original photograph of Walter in uniform. This lot comes from the descended family, so it is the first time this lot has been on the market. Also included is copies of his mic, medal roll and CWGC certificate, plus the 8th Battalion Bedfordshire regiment war diary which comes on a memory card in PDF format.

Code: 27292

Reserved


Superb 19th Century Percussion Pocket Pistol.

Superb 19th Century Percussion Pocket Pistol.

A beautiful quality 19th Century pocket box lock percussion pistol. It has a walnut chequered grip with silver lion head butt cap and diamond cartouche. A very good decorated lock and a turn off barrel which has the two Birmingham proof marks, steel trigger and guard.
This is a lovely quality weapon, but has no maker’s mark, so it may have been one of a cased pair. It is in very good working order and its only fault being, what looks like a crack on the side of the grip, or this could just be a scratch in the chequering, please see pictures.
A wonderful example of a box lock pocket, measuring 7 inches long.
Shipping to UK mainland only

Code: 27291

Reserved


WW2 Territorial Group of 6 to Kidd 5th Manchester Regiment.

WW2 Territorial Group of 6 to Kidd 5th Manchester Regiment.

A very exciting lot to one man of the Manchester territorials who served all through the second world war. this lot comprises of the medal group mounded on a brooch bar for wearing and comprises of the 1939/45 star, the France and Germany star, the Defence medal, the 1939/45 war medal and the Territorial efficient service medal George VI. The latter is correctly named to 3527086 L. H. Kidd. Manchester Regiment. confirmed 5th Manchester regiment. a WW2 issued general Service cap in Black for Royal Armoured Corps, this is a rare cap in black most were issued in drab, but for a very short time at the end of 1943, these were issued members of the Royal Armoured Corps. This comes complete with its original Manchester Regiment cap badge.
5th Battalion, Manchester Regiment was a territorial Machine Gun unit, they saw action in France in 1940 and were evacuated from Dunkirk. They converted to armour and were renamed 111th Regiment, Royal Armoured Corps. 111 RAC was based at Bingley, West Yorkshire.3 It began receiving its first tanks (Cruiser Mk IVs) in April 1942; but, from June, it began receiving Churchill infantry tanks and it was at this time that 11 Armoured Bde was detached from 42nd Armoured Division and became an independent Army Tank Brigade. On the 1st of November 1941. The battalion reverted to infantry in mid 1944 and served as a machine-gun battalion with 55th (West Lancashire) Division. But this man needs more research as most of the armoured divisions were transferred and served in northern Europe towards the end of the war.
This lot came to me via his remaining family and it is its first time on the market. The medals are in excellent condition and the cap is well used but has not suffered any moth damage.

Code: 27290

Reserved


A Pair Early 20th Century Spelter Cavalier Table Lamps.

A Pair Early 20th Century Spelter Cavalier Table Lamps.

A stunning pair of early 20th century table lamps in the form of two cavaliers both with drawn swords with excellent detail and quality. They are both made of spelter with a bronze finish and they come in excellent original condition with no damage or loss to the bronzing and both sit on solid mahogany bases.
They are wired for electricity but these need to be tested by a qualified electrician and possibly rewired. I take no responsibility for the safety of the electrical wiring.
Both measure 24 inches tall and would look fabulous with small shades in a living room or study.
Large and heavy so shipping will be via courier priced at £15.95

Code: 27289

120.00 GBP